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Category: Info Sharing

Prevention is the key to seeing me less!

Snow and colder weather are in the forecast this week. Make sure to plan for extra time in the morning. Being in a hurry is a common reason for the 3 primary types of winter injuries outlined below (and how to prevent them).

  • Shoveling
    • First, perform a few minutes of dynamic stretching and exercise to warm up. Even light snow can result in injury by way of repetitive bending and twisting. When possible, push the snow. If you need to “throw” the snow, make sure to square up rather than twist. Lift by bending at the hips while keeping the shovel close to your body. The further a load of weight is away from your body, the more strain that is put on your body. Listen to your body and take breaks as needed. I prefer doing a few squats or back bends every 5 minutes of shoveling to ensure that I am moving well and preventing injury. Check out Fundamental Strength's blog for visuals on proper shoveling and helpful exercises!
  • Slipping on ice
    • You don’t need to fall to sustain an injury. Slipping and “catching” yourself often results in worse strains than if you were to fall. I’m not advocating for you to fall of course, as the primary injuries incurred with falling are fractures and concussions. When walking on potentially slippery surfaces, it’s best to move slowly and shuffle your feet. Keep a good center of gravity and carry items in a pack to keep your hands available. This can also help to prevent head trauma if you fall back.
  • Car accident
    • Everyone understands that big collisions with air bags being deployed can result in serious injury. Not everyone realizes the effect of “fender benders” on the body. To keep it short, car frames are more effective at absorbing high impacts than low impacts. It saves lives, but results in more force being absorbed by the body in lower impacts. It’s important to seek care if you have pain that persists for more than 3 days. It’s even common to not have many symptoms for the first 1-2 weeks following these types of injuries! Headaches (new or more frequent), difficulty with concentration, sleep disruption, short-term memory loss are all things that require examination. Most chronic neck pain that I see is the result of untreated (or under-treated) “fender benders”. I cannot emphasize this enough. Patients will often tell me that they had little pain following an old accident, but then developed chronic tension headaches or neck pain in the months following. Be smart on the roads. Give yourself plenty of room to stop, but also to be able to move out of the way if someone behind you hasn’t done so themselves. If a collision happens, pay close attention to your body. If there is any question of injury, make an appointment.

Even good injury prevention practice doesn't work 100% of the time. It's always a good idea to keep this in mind when thinking about your health, time, and money...

The sooner you address any injury, the quicker it resolves.

Everything in life is TRAINING. The training of good movement and habits will reap good health.

Be your best.

Adam Millsop, D.C., CCSP

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Category: Acknowledgements and Awards

We were honored to make one of Minnesota Monthly's "Best of" lists earlier this month


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Category: Info Sharing

"Crossed reflex action mediated by muscle spindle afferent inputs has recently been revealed in humans. This raised the question of whether a complex spinal network involving commissural interneurons receiving inputs from proprioceptors and suprasegmental structures, as described in cats, persists in humans and contributes to the interlimb coordination during movement. First, we investigated the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying crossed reflex action between ankle plantar flexors and its corticospinal control from primary motor cortex. Second, we studied its modulation during motor tasks. We observed crossed inhibition in contralateral soleus motoneurons occurring with about 3 ms central latency, which is consistent with spinal transmission through oligosynaptic pathway. The early phase of inhibition was evoked with lower stimulus intensity than the late phase, suggesting mediation by group I and group II afferents, respectively. The postsynaptic origin of crossed inhibition is confirmed by the finding that both H-reflex and motor-evoked potential were reduced upon conditioning stimulation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation over ipsilateral and contralateral primary motor cortex reduced crossed inhibition, especially its late group II part. Last, late group II crossed inhibition was particularly depressed during motor tasks, especially when soleus was activated during the walking stance phase. Our results suggest that both group I and group II commissural interneurons participate in crossed reflex actions between ankle plantar flexors. Neural transmission at this level is depressed by descending inputs activated by transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor cortex or during movement. The specific modulation of group II crossed inhibition suggests control from monoaminergic midbrain structures and its role for interlimb coordination during locomotion."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24501265

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Category: Helpful Tips

I have to explain this to patients on a regular basis. Thankfully I have a lot of athletes and "gym rats" that want to be in control of their health and not dependent upon me or someone else doing it for them. It can be difficult getting through to them that working harder in the gym trying to get rid of their pain is often perpetuating their faulty biomechanics. Utilizing FMS and SFMA protocols helps us to determine where these breakdowns are occurring so we can correct them with manual therapies such as ART, chiropractic manipulation, and specific corrective exercises. At that point it's time to get back into the gym and "move often" so you can stay out of the clinic.

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